Street Scenes for Bioré at Midpoint Music Festival

 

When fall approaches, my head turns immediately to my go-to events of the season, and MidPoint Music Festival is one them. In the past, Fallon Thatcher has taken on the festival as a challenge and case study to reach the much-talked-about millennial audience. For MPMF 2012 we created a campaign for Busken Bakery called "Get Glazed," where a microsite hosted free tunes from participating bands. Also quirky, slightly askew videos called Yummy, Yummy Sprinkles and Super Awesome Balloon, along with a team of trained, very good looking "candy stripers" who passed out 10,000 donuts to festival goers.

Fast forward to 2014, and this year KAO Brands commissioned my team to do something a little different, asking us tospread their brand voice into new arenas not yet explored. Every year the MidPoint Music Festival draws 30,000 festival goers who flock to Cincinnati’s revitalized, urban core, to rock out to some of the world’s most up-and-coming indie bands.

MidPoint Music Festival

Spread across twelve venues downtown, the festival touts thousands of tatted out, flannel-clad, Doc Marten-wearing fans pound the pavement. Using the city as the backdrop, Fallon Thatcher decided to take the now-ubiquitous photo booth to the streets. The campaign, Bioré Street Scenes was created to cross the brand into the fashion space. The Bioré Street Scenes demonstrates that beauty and style can work together harmoniously - without all of the heavy-handed "brand speak" that commonly alienates concert-goers in this type of setting. For the campaign, a professional photographer and crew roved from venue to venue, capturing festival street style in beautifully composed photos that were uploaded to a microsite, biorestreetscenes.com.

This opportunity for Bioré was more than a sponsorship, or a global brand trying to speak to millennials. This campaign was a sign of respect directed to the consumer as a metaphorical peace treaty, where Bioré didn’t need to market their brand, but rather, join the consumer on their journey. How refreshing. Sometimes meeting in the middle can be ‘good enough’ and truly give the brand voice validity and authenticity. Experiential can’t be a non-sequitur meant to get in front of customers. It’s important to have a dialogue with your audience, and be authentic in doing so.

Street Scenes for Biore

 

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